Dealing with redness, dark spots, or blemishes? Use these color correcting tips! 

Color correcting helps cancel out a specific color or neutralize it so that your skin appears flawless.  Color Correcting and Color Correction Theory are complicated topics, and difficult to describe in a single blog, but I will do my best.  I encourage everyone to get their hands dirty or schedule a one-on-one lesson with a makeup artist to target specific concerns and get an in-depth analysis. That said, I will address some of the concerns I hear most often.

Color correcting helps cancel out a specific color or neutralize it so that your skin appears flawless.  We do this by When color correcting, use this color wheel to determine which color is on the opposite side of the color wheel from the undertone and use that color to cancel out the undertones you are trying to eliminate.isolating the underlying color (undertones) in whatever blemish you are addressing.  Use the color wheel to determine which color is on the opposite side of the color wheel from the undertone and use that color to cancel out the undertones you are trying to eliminate.

Many people are concerned with acne marks (redness), rosacea, dark spots, melasma, under eye circles, etc… If your foundation or concealer isn’t covering a spot of concern, I recommend color correcting.  Yes, it is an additional step, but it may be a step toward added confidence as well.

Below is a series of common questions I get from clients. I hope this helps address your area of concerns. Remember, I am always available via email (Megan@MeganMelone.com) to discuss these and other skin care issues.

Q: I have dark circles under my eyes, can you help me mask them? 

If your under eyes are blue or purple, and you have light to medium skin, you will want to correct this area with a peach or light peach corrector.  After you have corrected the area, you can use your concealer and the color should be neutralized.  Remember the skin is thin under your eyes. I recommend using concealers which are intended for that area.  If you don’t, the area can appear cakey.  Also, I recommend using a VERY finely milled powder (like RCMA no color) very lightly to set the area.  If you are experiencing dryness, hydrate with an eye cream prior to color correcting.

Q: I have some redness in my skin, how can I conceal the red without caking on the makeup?

A: To neutralize the red in your skin, use a mint green corrector.  If you look at a color wheel, red and green are on the opposite side, this means that the green will actually counter the red thus eliminating the red (works great for rosacea or ruddy complexions or as a spot corrector on a pimple).  After you use the green corrector, you can apply your foundation being careful NOT to rub the corrector off.  I recommend using a beauty blender or a brush that isn’t super stiff.  If you use a blender, lightly bounce the blender to blend out the edges of the concealer/foundation.

Q:  I have dark skin and my under eyes look very dark (purple/blue), how can I correct this?

A: If you have darker skin, you will want to reach for a darker orange or salmon colored corrector to neutralize the purple undertones under your eyes.  DO NOT (I REPEAT!!!! DO NOT) use orange lipstick under your eyes.  A while ago, there was a video trolling Facebook in which a blogger used orange lipstick to conceal the under eye area.  The result was beautiful, however, lipstick is not formulated for use around the eye.  The skin is very thin in this area and can cause reactions or tiny white bumps called milia.  Reach for something that is actually intended to correct the eye area.

Q : My skin looks so drab and dull, is there anything I can do to bring my skin back to life (especially in the winter)?

A: Yes, lilac correctors or primers can help nicely by not only making the skin appear less sallow, but also neutralizing the yellow spots.  Lilac is a great color for brightening light to medium skin tones and making the skin appear more vibrant.

General color correcting tips:

If you are experiencing dryness, hydrate with an eye cream prior to color correcting.

  1. Apply skincare (moisturizers and serums) prior to color correcting, and let it soak into the skin!
  2. Apply your corrector in thin layers (a small synthetic brush or beauty blender will work great here).  Build up the corrector if needed by using these thin layers.
  3. Use lightweight products, so your makeup is less likely to cake. I have a product in testing, so please join my Facebook group “Megan Melone Beauty” for the latest in product releases.
  4. Blend the corrector out, if you can see it through your foundation, you either haven’t blended or you used too much product.

Beautifully,

Megan

 

 

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